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Saint Jean Carbon developing recycled high-performance lithium-ion battery

Oakville, Ontario carbon science company Saint Jean Carbon Inc. (TSXV:SJL) has announced plans, along with an unnamed battery manufacturing partner, to build two versions of a high-powered, full scale lithium-ion battery, using recycled/upcycling material from an electric car power pack and the other using upcycled anode material supplied by Saint Jean Carbon.
The project is anticipated to take six months to complete, and if successful will provide a stepping stone in a multi-design build project to then build a test vehicle using the batteries.
“The focus to work together to create a fully functioning upcycled battery is really a great opportunity for all parties involved, and aligns perfectly with our overall strategy,” said Saint Jean Carbon CEO Paul Ogilvie. “We have always had concerns about the significant amount of raw materials needed for lithium-ion batteries, frankly; making the environmentally sound energy storage devices, not so environmentally friendly when you dispose of them. With our technology and the knowledge strength within our team, we feel strongly, very promising results may come from the project. We look forward to presenting the results and any milestones as they get completed.”
The aim of the project is to prove that the raw material can be re-used over and over again, greatly reducing the demand for continued mining and providing an environmental benefit.
The project will unfold in three stages. 1) Saint Jean Carbon will use its proprietary and patented systems to dismantle and separate the chemistry and hard materials. 2) The surfacing of the raw materials will be design and re-engineered. 3) Two identical cells will be constructed, one with new material and one with upcycled materials, both of which will be tested to over 10,000 cycles to create realistic sampling test results.
To be able to build a high performance lithium-ion battery (HPL) through re-engineering and re-purposing recycled materials should have a significant impact on the raw material chain in energy storage applications and also bring down the cost of electric vehicles.
In October, Saint Jean Carbon produced two samples of single layer (one atom thick) graphene, produced without any chemicals or any mechanical systems that would harm the high order of carbon structure and wettability.
Those samples were then sent to National Research Council of Canada (NRC), and will be used to help set the national standard for graphene production and quality.
Earlier this month, the company hired University of Waterloo Canadian Research Chair and Professor in Advanced Materials for Clean Energy and Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology Department of Chemical Engineering, Dr. Zhongwei Chen PhD, MSChE, BS, as its new chief technology officer, to lead technology planning, engineering and implementation of Saint Jean Carbon’s clean energy storage and energy creation initiatives.
Saint Jean Carbon has approximately 35 other secondary and tertiary patents in development.
Over the past year, Saint Jean Carbon has filed several patents for applications of graphene, including the first  superconductivity room temperature wire, a proprietary method for production of single layer natural graphene with no impurities and without heat damage, production of diamagnetic graphene for repelling magnetic fields to temper and control graphene, and a glucose meter that uses magnetic resistance graphene to instantaneously detect micro-changes via saline levels from tear ducts, which can be used as a diabetes alert.
Saint Jean Carbon has been researching technology applications for graphite in lithium-ion batteries since 2007, and now has significant interests in graphite mining claims in Quebec, as well as lithium interests at the Whabouchi mine, located in the James Bay region.

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