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BlackBerry takes aim at Apple’s spam problem

“A spammer only needs to create a dummy email account, and then hack into the iMessage database to message anyone with your iMessage details (such as Apple ID or phone number)”

Since the launch of the iPhone, in 2007, the media has reported on breach after breach after breach of its security, which some claim is actually non-existent.

This failing would seem to be a logical target for the Cupertino company’s rivals and indeed Canada’s BlackBrry has repeatedly looked to leverage its own security, which many regard as best in class. But putting sales of iPhones against sales of BlackBerrys for the past seven years would seem to confirm that consumers simply don’t care.

But what about enterprise customers?

Since John Chen took over as CEO last November, he has repeated the mantra that BlackBerry must focus on its core strengths in enterprise and security.

Yesterday, BlackBerry appealed to enterprise customers in a post on its own blog that took yet another run at its fellow fruit-monikered rival.

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The head of product and brand marketing for BBM, Jeff Gadway, quoted a recent article from Wired that claimed Apple’s iMessage has become a haven for spammers, citing one source who says the service now accounts for almost a third of all mobile spam messages.

“WIRED reports that it is “very easy” to spam an iMessage user because of the integration of Apple’s computers (MacBooks and iMacs) and its mobile devices (iPhones and iPads)”, says Gadway. “A spammer only needs to create a dummy email account, and then hack into the iMessage database to message anyone with your iMessage details (such as Apple ID or phone number). Landesman from Cloudmark calls it “a spammer’s dream,” adding “with four lines of code, using Apple scripts, you can tell your Mac machine to send a message to whoever they want.”

Gadway echoes the opinion of a recently proposed solution by none other than the New York Times, which suggests that users concerned with security try the recently cross-platformed BBM instead of iMessage. He says BBM is better because of its “invite and accept” paradigm and its encryption.

Will the message about iMessage once again ring on deaf ears?

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About The Author /

Cantech Letter founder and editor Nick Waddell has lived in five Canadian provinces and is proud of his country's often overlooked contributions to the world of science and technology. Waddell takes a regular shift on the Canadian media circuit, making appearances on CTV, CBC and BNN, and contributing to publications such as Canadian Business and Business Insider.

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