Zecotek secures mass production deal

Zecotek's Micro-pixel Avalanche Photo Diodes (MAPD). The company believes its imaging division technology will reduce the cost of a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner by up to 40%, by replacing the  bulky phototubes used in traditional scanners.

Zecotek’s Micro-pixel Avalanche Photo Diodes (MAPD). The company believes its imaging division technology will reduce the cost of a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner by up to 40%, by replacing the bulky phototubes used in traditional scanners.

Zecotek Photonics (TSXV:ZMS) today announced it had selected Korea’s National NanoFab Center to manufacture its photodiode (MAPD) solid-state photo detector arrays.

Zecotek believes its imaging division technology, which includes crystals, photo detectors and data acquisition or read-out electronics, will reduce the cost of a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner by up to 40%, by replacing the bulky phototubes used in traditional scanners. PET scanners sell for between $1-million and $2.5-million.

“With our growing relationship with CERN [the European Organization for Nuclear Research] and interest from positron emission tomography (PET) scanner manufactures and designers, it was necessary to secure a manufacturing facility that will be able to meet the worldwide demand for our new alternative photo detectors,” said Zecotek CEO Dr. Faouzi Zerrouk.

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Vancouver-based Zecotek, which dates its history back to 2004, is the brainchild of Zerrouk, an English educated PhD in Theoretical Physics, who became a leading expert in photonics technologies. Today, after investing more than $25 million in its technology, Zecotek owns title to or controls more than fifty-five patents and applications and is on the verge of commercializing its laser systems, high-performance crystals, solid-state photo detectors and other imaging and 3D display technologies.

Most of the recent action around Zecotek, including a patent infringement lawsuit against Saint-Gobain and Philips that was launched in February, is centered around its imaging division.

But Steve Palmer, a fund manager with AlphaNorth Asset Management told Cantech Letter recently that he believes each of the company’s three distinct operating divisions could be worth more than its current overall value.

“What I like about Zecotek is that they have multiple initiatives each of which could have a significantly positive impact.” He said, adding: “The lawsuit could have a substantial impact. Zecotek’s current market value is only $35 million. We think the value of the lawsuit could be $200 million or more. The company also has a 3D screen technology which doesn’t require glasses and a laser division. Each of these, if successfully commercialized could also be worth several hundred million dollars in value to the company.”

At press time, shares of Zecotek were up 2.6% to $.40 cents.

Disclosure: Zecotek is a sponsor of Cantech Letter.

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About Nick Waddell

Cantech Letter founder and editor Nick Waddell has lived in five Canadian provinces and is proud of his country's often overlooked contributions to the world of science and technology. Waddell takes a regular shift on the Canadian media circuit, making appearances on CTV, CBC and BNN, and contributing to publications such as Canadian Business and Business Insider.

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